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We are very excited to finally have our blog up and running and to tell you all the exciting things on the go. We hope that you can take the time to browse our blog weekly and learn how to incorporate music & wellbeing practices into every day routines. In this blog you will also find the latest information for Australian Early Childhood and Primary Education Professionals.

10th February 2012

Learning through Music

The Bonkers Beat Philosophy is based on Five Main Principals:
1.        Respect for all people
2.        Respect for all animals & living  creatures
3.        Respect for all plants & nature
4.        Respect for kinder & personal belongings
5.        Respect for yourself
We believe that all these principals are vital for us to work, live together and take care of our planet.
You may discuss these important values at home and sing this song with your child or the whole family.

Song of the Week

“I Respect”  – (Tune of “Bingo”)

1. I love playing with my friends

And I look after them, so…

I respect my friends,

I respect my friends,

I respect my friends,

And that is good to do, Oh!

  1. I love books and I love toys

And I look after them, so…

I respect all things,

I respect all things,

I respect all things,

And that is good to do, Oh!

  1. I love dogs and I love cats

And other living creatures

I respect them all,

I respect them all,

I respect them all,

And that is good to do, Oh!

  1. I love trees and flowers too

And I look after them, so…

I respect all plants,

I respect all plants,

I respect them all,

And that is good to do, Oh!

Wellbeing Practices for Life

Yoga is recognised as a practice that promotes physical strength, flexibility, body awareness, balance and mental focus. Yoga also helps us to connect with ourselves, with society and with the planet.

Weekly News for Early childhood (Australian based framework, EYLF)
‘The nature of the two frameworks’
The Early Years Learning Framework and the Australian Curriculum have a great deal in common. Both take up the challenge of the Melbourne Declaration;
both respond to a rapidly changing world context; and both are underpinned by the belief that education has the power to transform the individual and society.
The Early Years Learning Framework is focused on learning and the role of the educator. It aims to guide the complex, interactive work of early childhood educators that enables particular kinds of learning and nurtures particular kinds of learners4. The framework therefore gives serious attention to essential elements of high-quality early childhood practice, including play-based pedagogies, strong relationships with children and families and intentional teaching.
On these foundations, the EYLF is structured around three interrelated elements: Principles, Practices and Learning Outcomes.
The EYLF (p. 19) identifies five Learning Outcomes as fundamental to the current and future wellbeing, engagement and success of young learners:

  • Children have a strong sense of identity
  • Children are connected with and contribute to their world
  • Children have a strong sense of wellbeing
  • Children are confident and involved learners
  • Children are effective communicators.

The five Learning Outcomes include dispositions towards learning that underpin engagement, and the knowledge, skills and understandings that are essential foundations for future learning success.
The Australian Curriculum has a similar mission to foster ‘successful, confident and creative learners and active and informed citizens’.
The Australian Curriculum is based on principles of entitlement and responsibility. It sets out what will be taught, what students need to learn and the expected quality of that learning (The Shape of the Australian Curriculum, v3.0, ACARA 2011, p. 10 16a, 16b):
The Australian Curriculum recognises the entitlement of each student to knowledge, understanding and skills that provide a foundation for successful and lifelong learning and participation in the Australian community.
The Australian Curriculum is presented as a continuum that makes clear to teachers what is to be taught across the years of schooling. It makes clear to students what they should learn and the quality of learning expected of them as they progress through school.
The Australian Curriculum has four major components:
• Curriculum content—learning area knowledge, skills and understanding
• General capabilities—sets of skills, behaviours and dispositions that apply across subject-based content
• Cross-curriculum priorities—selected because they represent key issues and opportunities relevant to the lives of young Australians now and in the future
• Achievement standards—a description of what students are typically able to understand and do at particular points in their schooling.

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